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Showing posts with label NEOCP Confirmation Page. Show all posts
Showing posts with label NEOCP Confirmation Page. Show all posts

Jun 9, 2018

Confirmation Images of the COMET C/2018 L2 (ATLAS) on 2018-06-07

...

A confirmation image of the COMET C/2018 L2 (ATLAS)
on 2018-06-07 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken
with iTelescope.net's (T27 TEL 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
By Steven M. Tilley


A confirmation image of the COMET C/2018 L2 (ATLAS)
on 2018-06-07 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken
with iTelescope.net's (T27 TEL 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
By Steven M. Tilley


A confirmation image of the COMET C/2018 L2 (ATLAS)
on 2018-06-07 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken
with iTelescope.net's (T27 TEL 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
By Steven M. Tilley

A confirmation image of the COMET C/2018 L2 (ATLAS)
on 2018-06-07 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken
with iTelescope.net's (T27 TEL 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
By Steven M. Tilley



Jun 3, 2018

A Rock Designated ZLAF9B2(now 2018 LA) Social Media and Fireball Reports

On  2018-06-02 Richard A. Kowalski, with the Catalina Sky Survey reported observations of a "new" object, given  the observer-assigned temporary designation "ZLAF9B2", to  Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.  It was posted to the NEOCP(NEO Confirmation Page) making the observations available to asteroid and comet  researcher around the world.   The data was analyzed and posted JPL's Scout: NEOCP Hazard Assessment, independently analyzed and posted to Bill Gray's  Current NEOCP summary page. Then emails  to mailing list post to social madia started going out. It was know to be small at the start.

When wroke up on 2018-06-02 I check iTelescope.net and saw their facility in Siding Spring Observatory, AU was clouded out than I went out to eat breakfast.  When got back just to see what I would observe if I could observe, I check the NEOCP and saw that ZLAF9B2 was "bright",  and  then  check "The Minor Planet Mailing List {MPML}" Some of the asteroid and comet researchers where talking.  The Bill Gray sent and a number of  carefully worded emails to email list  stating ZLAF9B2 should be a "Priority Target".
 
One of the programs available to asteroid and comet researchers is Find_Orb it is useful for calculating approximate ephemeris, determining approximate orbits, residuals,  generating virtual asteroids, virtual impactors, predicting impact locations, and many other things.  It should be noted  IF one uses wrong setting one get a totally wrong solution. One things Find_Orb can be use for is generating a "asteroid risk corridor" with the help of Guide 9.1. This should be done with care because of uncertainties in  observations how one sets the over-observing parameters as well with other setting can the effect the results.  Bill Gray posted post a risk corridor for ZLAF9B2 and I thought I would give it a try. I had Find_Orb generated  virtual asteroids and virtual impactors using a  monte carlo process. 


Here is my TEST with Find_Orb using a monte carlo process see the files here

Here is my TEST with Find_Orb using a monte carlo process see the files here
Before I share my results ZLAF9B2(now 2018 LA)  "impacted" the Earth over southern Africa creating a Fireball. around 2018-06-02 16:45 UT and posts about impact started making.  After the impact two (pre-impact) follow up observations from ATLAS-MLO(Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System ---Mauna Loa) were posted to  the NEOCP(NEO Confirmation Page)  Then I did another  monte carlo process with the newly added ATLAS observations.

Test with the newly added ATLAS observations with Find_Orb
 using a monte carlo process see the files here
On 2018-06-04  the Minor Planet Center issues MPEC 2018-L04 : 2018 LA  Stating
"that the objectreached 50-km height above the Earth's surface around 16:51 UTC over southern Africa."

Timeline of SOME of the Post to Social Media














Apr 26, 2018

Confirmation Images of the NEO 2018 HH2

The NEO 2018 HH2( ZH0A971) on 2018-04-24
from Sierra Remote Observatory, Auberry, California, USA (MPC U69)
a stack of 15 - 15 Second Luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T24 TEL 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The NEO 2018 HH2( ZH0A971) on 2018-04-24
from Sierra Remote Observatory, Auberry, California, USA (MPC U69)
a stack of 15 - 15 Second Luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T24 TEL 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The NEO 2018 HH2( ZH0A971) on 2018-04-24
from Sierra Remote Observatory, Auberry, California, USA (MPC U69)
a stack of 15 - 15 Second Luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T24 TEL 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley


See: MPEC 2018-H89 : 2018 HH2

Apr 23, 2018

Confirmation images of the NEO 2018 HC1

A confirmation image of the NEO 2018 HC1 on
2018-04-21 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15 - 05 Second Luminance BIN2
images taken with iTelescope.net's
(T30 TEL 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the NEO 2018 HC1 on
2018-04-21 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15 - 05 Second Luminance BIN2
images taken with iTelescope.net's
(T30 TEL 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the NEO 2018 HC1 on
2018-04-21 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15 - 05 Second Luminance BIN2
images taken with iTelescope.net's
(T30 TEL 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
By Steven M. Tilley

Mar 19, 2018

Confirmation of the NEO 2018 FC1

The NEOCP object ZF278E4(now the NEO 2018 FC1) on 2018-03-19
a stack of 20-30 second luminance BIN2 images taken with
 
iTelescope.net's (T17 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
 at Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia
(MPC code Q62) 

By Steven M. Tilley
The NEOCP object ZF278E4(now the NEO 2018 FC1) on 2018-03-19
a stack of 20-30 second luminance BIN2 images taken with
 
iTelescope.net's (T17 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
 at Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia
(MPC code Q62) 

By Steven M. Tilley
The NEOCP object ZF278E4(now the NEO 2018 FC1) on 2018-03-19
a stack of 20-30 second luminance BIN2 images taken with
 
iTelescope.net's (T17 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
 at Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia
(MPC code Q62) 

By Steven M. Tilley
 Background
(as of 2018-02-19)
  • Object: 2018 FC1
  • Orbit Type: Amor [NEO]
  • Approximate Diameter: 120 m - 260 m (393.701 feet to 853.018 feet) (Absolute Magnitude: H= 21.766)
  • On the Sentry Risk Table: NO
  • On the NEODyS CLOMON2 risk page: NO 
  • Discovery observation was made on: 2018 03 17.33572
  • Discovery observation was made by Catalina Sky Survey (MPC Code 703) The Discovery M.P.E.C.:MPEC 2018-F40 : 2018 FC1
  • Last Observation (publish): 2018 03 19.53148 (at iTelescope Observatory, Siding Spring,  Australia (MPC Code Q62) )
  • Data-Arc Span (publish): 2 days 
  • Number of Optical Observations(published):42
  • Observatories Reporting (Published) Observations(MPC Code):
    • (033) Karl Schwarzschild Observatory, Tautenburg, Germany.
    • (474) Mount John Observatory, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand.
    • (703) Catalina Sky Survey, US/Arizona.
    • (734) Farpoint Observatory, Eskridge, US/Kansas.
    • (807) Cerro Tololo Observatory, La Serena, Chile.
    • (E23) Arcadia, Australia/NSW.
    • (I52) Steward Observatory, Mt. Lemmon Station, US/Arizona.
    • (Q62) iTelescope Observatory, Siding Spring,  Australia/NSW. 
  • Perihelion Distance:1.106589693409455(AU)
  • Aphelion Distance: 2.130212399099761(AU)
  • Earth MOID (Earth center to NEO center): 0.19123 AU (( 74.421 LD)), (4490.28 Earth radii) or  17775939 miles (  (28607600 KM))
  • Next Close-Approach to Earth:  Will safely pass Earth on 2018-Mar-30 at a 
    • Minimum Distance(Earth center to NEO center) of 0.192881774004264 (AU) (75.064 (LD)), (4,516.07 Earth radii) or  17,878,004 miles ( (28,854,702 KM)) 
    • Nominal Distance(Earth center to NEO center) of 0.196815739374881(AU) ( 76.595 (LD)), ( 4,621.44 Earth radii) or 18,295,166 miles (29,443,216 (KM))
    • Maximum Distance(Earth center to NEO center) of 0.20074975749401 (AU) ( 78.126 (LD)), ( 4,713.82 Earth radii) or  18,660,856 miles (30,031,736 (KM))   

Jun 19, 2017

Confirmation Images of The NEO 2017 MC

A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Mayhill, New Mexico (New Mexico Skies) (MPC Code H06),
a stack of 5-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T11 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Mayhill, New Mexico (New Mexico Skies) (MPC Code H06),
a stack of 5-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T11 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Mayhill, New Mexico (New Mexico Skies) (MPC Code H06),
a stack of 5-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T11 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Mayhill, New Mexico (New Mexico Skies) (MPC Code H06),
a stack of 5-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T11 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Mayhill, New Mexico (New Mexico Skies) (MPC Code H06),
a stack of 50-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T11 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia (MPC Code Q62),
a stack of 20-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T31 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia (MPC Code Q62),
a stack of 20-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T31 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia (MPC Code Q62),
a stack of 20-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T31 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation images of the NEO 2017 MC on 2017-06-18
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia (MPC Code Q62),
a stack of 60-30 Second Luminance BIN2 Images taken with itelescope.net's
(TEL T31 0.50-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer)
(c) Steven M. Tilley

Background

(as of 2017-06-18)
  • Object: 2017 MC
  • Approximate Diameter:  150 m - 380 m ( 492.126 feet to feet 1246.72)(Absolute Magnitude: H= 21.021)
  • Orbit Type: Apollo [NEO] Potentially Hazardous Asteroid
  • On the Sentry Risk Table: NO
  • On the NEODyS CLOMON2 risk page: NO
  • Discovery (First) observation was made: 2017 06 16.53663
  • Discovery (First )observation was made by:  ATLAS-MLO(Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System)(MPC Code  T08) The Discovery M.P.E.C.: MPEC 2017-M15 : 2017 MC
  • Last Observation(publish) was made: 2017 06 18.64005 (by iTelescope Observatory, Siding Spring   (MPC Code Q62 )
  • Data-Arc Span(publish) :  2 days
  • Number of Optical Observations(published) : 76 
  • Observatories Reporting (Published) Observations(MPC Code):
    • (104) San Marcello Pistoiese, Italy.
    • (160) Castelmartini, Italy.
    • (204) Schiaparelli Observatory, Italy.
    • (595) Farra d'Isonzo, Italy.
    • (926) Tenagra II Observatory, Nogales, US/Arizona.
    • (B49) Paus Observatory, Sabadell, Spain.
    • (B74) Santa Maria de Montmagastrell, Spain.
    • (C23) Olmen,Belgium.
    • (H06) iTelescope Observatory, Mayhill, US/New Mexico.
    • (I93) St Pardon de Conques (N44.558708 W0.203000) France.
    • (J69) North Observatory, Clanfield (N50.939011 W1.019700) UK.
    • (J95) Great Shefford,UK.
    • (K38) M57 Observatory, Saltrio, Italy.
    • (K63) G. Pascoli Observatory, Castelvecchio Pascoli, Italy.
    • (K88) GINOP-KHK, Piszkesteto, Hungary.
    • (Q62) iTelescope Observatory, Siding Spring, Australia/NSW.
    • (T08) ATLAS-MLO, Mauna Loa,US/Hawaii.
    • (W25) RMS Observatory, Cincinnati,US/Ohio.
    • (W34) Squirrel Valley Observatory, Columbus, US/North Carolina.
    • (Y00) SONEAR Observatory, Oliveira, Brazil.

Jan 17, 2017

A NEO Re-Confirmation for the Asteroid 2016 VM4

The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69)
a stack of 30-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 5-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 5-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 5-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 5-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-15 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 5-120 Second Luminance BIN1 Images
 taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-16 from
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69)
 a stack of 12-120 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-16 from
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69)
 a stack of 3-120 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
-- sometimes stars get in the way--
By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-16 from
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69)
 a stack of 3-120 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley

The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-16 from
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69)
a stack of 3-120 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
The asteroid 2016 VM4 on 2017-01-16 from 
Sierra Remote Observatory. Auberry California USA ( MPC U69) 
a stack of 3-120 Second Luminance BIN2 Images 
taken with iTelescope.net's (TEL T24 0.61-m f/6.5 reflector + CCD)
 By Steven M. Tilley
When seeking out imaging targets I often check the NEO Confirmation Page for an object that is not too faint,  not too fast, not too close to a bright moon, and not too much uncertainty.  This weekend found one and observed it for two nights. With the observations from observers from around the world along with my observations the MPC match to the known asteroid 2016 VM4 (this is not unusual.  2016 VM4 had previously been only observed for 3 days in November of 2016 and had a poorly defined orbit. 

Jan 9, 2017

Confirmation images of the NEO 2017 AF5


A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-06 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T7 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley

A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-06 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T7 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley

A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-06 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T7 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-06 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T7 TEL 0.43-m f/6.8 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Near Earth Objects 2017 AF5
on 2017-01-07 from AstroCamp Observatory. Nerpio, Spain - (MPC Code I89)
using itelescope.net's (T18 TEL 0.32-m f/8.0 reflector + CCD)
a stack of 5-60 Second Luminance BIN2 Images
(C) Steven M. Tilley
Background
(as of 2017-01-09 )
 

Useful Links:
 

Nov 18, 2016

Images of The Asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15 and 2016-11-16

Asteroid(and comet) observing is done by taking a series of images of a section of the night sky over a period of time with a telescope and CCD. Then data reduction is performed on the images looking for moving objects. The observer needs to make two or more observation for each moving object. All “known” objects have a designation, if the observer knows the object’s designation the observation can be reported using the object's designation. If the observer is not trying to identify objects, it is an unknown object or if there is any doubt, an observer-assigned temporary designation is used. The Minor Planet Center’s(MPC) computers check to see if any observations reported  with an observer-assigned temporary designation matchs a “known” objects,  If  any are  "unknown" and its "NEO score is 65” it is posted to “The NEOConfirmation Page”(NEOCP)

Many observers watch the NEOCP and do follow-up observation on listed objects.   As more observational data comes in better orbital elements can be generated, the "unknown" object may be shown to be a "known" object or shown to be a "new" object. When there are enough observations to generate useful orbital elements the object is assigned a provisional designation by the Minor Planet Center if the object is a NEO, a comet, or unusual a Minor Planet Electronic Circular will be issued.  It is possible over time with additional observational data two or more provisional designations maybe link showing they are the same object.   After four well-observed oppositions for main-belt (two to three for NEOs), asteroids are given a  number ( or their permanent designation and they are eligible to be named by the discoverer).

While many observers will targete NEOs for follow-up observations however other asteroids( i.e., Mars-crossers, main-belt, etc.) may be neglected and over time may become "lost."  On 2016-10-19  a new object was found by Pan-STARRS 1, it was posted to the NEOCP.  Three more observatories submitted observations, and on 2016-10-20.92 it was shown to be a Mars-crossing asteroid and the MPC assigned it the provisional designation 2016 UG.  Since it was not a NEO and pose no danger to Earth, no one targeted it for any follow-up observations.  Then on 2016-11-14 Pan-STARRS 1 reported observations for an object under an observer-assigned temporary designation and it was posted to the NEOCP.  Then observations were reported from two more observatories(including myself), and on 2016-11-16.06 the  "new" NEOCP object was shown to be the Mars-crossing asteroid, 2016 UG  and the orbital elements were updated.

Observations Made Before  the  Object  Was Updates.

A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
Observations Made After  the  Object  Was Updates.
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley


A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 15 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley
Background 
(as of 2016-11-17)