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Showing posts with label Mars-crossing Asteroid. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mars-crossing Asteroid. Show all posts

Aug 19, 2018

Helping With The Confirmation of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23

On 2018-08-13 I check the NEO Confirmation Page(NEOCP) and  an object clalled ZTF00Th.
Orbit diagram for 2018 PO23
(view 1)
2018-08-13 12:35 UTC
Earth Distance: 0.723 au
Sun Distance: 1.691 au
courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltec
https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2018PO23
Orbit diagram for 2018 PO23
(view 2)
2018-08-13 12:35 UTC
Earth Distance: 0.723 au
Sun Distance: 1.691 au
courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltec
https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2018PO23
Orbit diagram for 2018 PO23
(view 3)
2018-08-13 12:35 UTC
Earth Distance: 0.723 au
Sun Distance: 1.691 au
courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltec
https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2018PO23

I was able to obtain a  set of  4-60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's (T30) and a set 12-60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's (T30). I use Astrometrica to do the data reduction by way of the stack and track method. I had Astrometrica stack 3 sets(stacks) of 3 images.  Each image was shifted match movement of ZTF00Th.
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-13 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 4-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T30)
Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-13 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 4-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T30)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-13 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 4-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T30)
Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-13 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 4-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T30)
By Steven M. Tilley
Then I  submitted this batch of  4 observation to the Minor Planet Center.
About 14 hours later I  obtain a  set of  60-60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's(T11) I had Astrometrica stack 3 stacks of 15 images ( note a star keep me from having  4 stacks of 15 images)
 
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from from Mayhill,
New Mexico [New Mexico Skies](MPC Code H06)
 a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T11)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from from Mayhill,
New Mexico [New Mexico Skies](MPC Code H06)
 a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T11)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from from Mayhill,
New Mexico [New Mexico Skies](MPC Code H06)
 a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T11)
By Steven M. Tilley
Then I  submitted this batch of  3 observation to the Minor Planet Center.
After another ten  hours I  obtain a  set of  60-60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's(T17) I had Astrometrica stack 3 stacks of 15 images ( note the first 9 images where on the "wrong" side of the meridian flip)
 A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T17)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T17)
By Steven M. Tilley
A confirmation image of the Mars-crossing Asteroid 2018 PO23
on 2018-08-14 from Siding Spring Observatory,
Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15-60 second luminance BIN2 images
taken with iTelescope.net's (T17)
By Steven M. Tilley
Then I  submitted this batch of 3  observation to the Minor Planet Center.

After 110 observations,  collectively made from 27 observatories from around the world, at Aug. 16.90, 2018 the Minor Planet Center gave  ZTF00Th. the provisional designation 2018 PO23 and removed it form the NEOCP.

Nov 18, 2016

Images of The Asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15 and 2016-11-16

Asteroid(and comet) observing is done by taking a series of images of a section of the night sky over a period of time with a telescope and CCD. Then data reduction is performed on the images looking for moving objects. The observer needs to make two or more observation for each moving object. All “known” objects have a designation, if the observer knows the object’s designation the observation can be reported using the object's designation. If the observer is not trying to identify objects, it is an unknown object or if there is any doubt, an observer-assigned temporary designation is used. The Minor Planet Center’s(MPC) computers check to see if any observations reported  with an observer-assigned temporary designation matchs a “known” objects,  If  any are  "unknown" and its "NEO score is 65” it is posted to “The NEOConfirmation Page”(NEOCP)

Many observers watch the NEOCP and do follow-up observation on listed objects.   As more observational data comes in better orbital elements can be generated, the "unknown" object may be shown to be a "known" object or shown to be a "new" object. When there are enough observations to generate useful orbital elements the object is assigned a provisional designation by the Minor Planet Center if the object is a NEO, a comet, or unusual a Minor Planet Electronic Circular will be issued.  It is possible over time with additional observational data two or more provisional designations maybe link showing they are the same object.   After four well-observed oppositions for main-belt (two to three for NEOs), asteroids are given a  number ( or their permanent designation and they are eligible to be named by the discoverer).

While many observers will targete NEOs for follow-up observations however other asteroids( i.e., Mars-crossers, main-belt, etc.) may be neglected and over time may become "lost."  On 2016-10-19  a new object was found by Pan-STARRS 1, it was posted to the NEOCP.  Three more observatories submitted observations, and on 2016-10-20.92 it was shown to be a Mars-crossing asteroid and the MPC assigned it the provisional designation 2016 UG.  Since it was not a NEO and pose no danger to Earth, no one targeted it for any follow-up observations.  Then on 2016-11-14 Pan-STARRS 1 reported observations for an object under an observer-assigned temporary designation and it was posted to the NEOCP.  Then observations were reported from two more observatories(including myself), and on 2016-11-16.06 the  "new" NEOCP object was shown to be the Mars-crossing asteroid, 2016 UG  and the orbital elements were updated.

Observations Made Before  the  Object  Was Updates.

A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-15
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of 15 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
Observations Made After  the  Object  Was Updates.
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley


A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 5 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the asteroid 2016 UG on 2016-11-16
 from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
 a stack of 15 - 120 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's 
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
 (C) Steven M. Tilley
Background 
(as of 2016-11-17)