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Dec 1, 2016

The NEO 2016 WJ1 on 2016-12-01 from Siding Spring - Australia

See The NEO 2016 WJ1 Has Been Removed from the Sentry Risk Table--Neodys Risk Table List 3 Possible Impacts 2106-2115.

NOTE with only 12 days data-arc span there is "little" known about the NEO 2016 WJ1 and the information in this post may become outdated. So one should always check the links for updates. Whenever an object is posted to one the risk lists (especially if it has a Torino Scale 1 or greater) and it is observable, observers will take a particular interest in it. In the coming days it is possible there will be more follow-up observations and a search in archives for precovery observations. It is MOST likely this object will be removed from the risk lists. It could take observations over one or more orbital periods before we can reliably say where it will be from 2030 to 2108.
Background
(as of 2016-12-01 9:50am CST)
 
  • Object: 2016 WJ1 
  • Approximate Diameter: 140 m - 310 m (459.318 feet to 1017.06 feet)(Absolute Magnitude: H= 21.402)
  • Orbit Type: Apollo [NEO]- Potentially Hazardous Asteroid
  • On the Sentry Risk Table: yes  NO
  •  Torino Scale(JPL): 1 
    • "A routine discovery in which a pass near the Earth is predicted that poses no unusual level of danger. Current calculations show the chance of collision is extremely unlikely with no cause for public attention or public concern. New telescopic observations very likely will lead to re-assignment to Level 0"
  • On the NEODyS CLOMON2 risk page: yes
  • Torino Scale(NEODyS CLOMON2): 1
  • First observation was made: 2016 11 19.46522
  • First observed by: Mt. Lemmon Survey (MPC Code G96) The Discovery M.P.E.C.: MPEC 2016-W38 : 2016 WJ1
  • Last Observation(publish): 2016 12 01.48096 (by iTelescope Observatory  (MPC Code Q62)
  • Data-Arc Span(publish) : 12 days
  • Number of Optical Observations(published): 222
  • Observatories Reporting (Published) Observations(MPC Code):
    • (151) Eschenberg Observatory, Winterthur, Switzerland. 
    • (203) GiaGa Observatory, Italy.  
    • (246) Klet Observatory-KLENOT, Czech Republic.  
    • (291) LPL/Spacewatch II,Arizona,US. 
    • (691) Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak-Spacewatch, Arizona,US.
    • (926) Tenagra II Observatory, Nogales,Arizona,US. 
    • (958) Observatoire de Dax,France.
    • (A17) Guidestar Observatory, Weinheim, Germany.
    • (A48) Povegliano Veronese,Italy.
    • (C47) Nonndorf, Austria.
    • (E10) Siding Spring-Faulkes Telescope South, NSW,Australia.
    • (F51) Pan-STARRS 1, Haleakala,Hawaii,US. 
    • (G96) Mt. Lemmon Survey, Arizona,US.
    • (H06) iTelescope Observatory, Mayhill,New Mexico,US.
    • (H21) Astronomical Research Observatory, Westfield,Illinois,US.
    • (H45) Arkansas Sky Obs., Petit Jean Mountain South,Arizona,US. 
    • (I52) Steward Observatory, Mt. Lemmon Station, Arizona,US.
    • (J04) ESA Optical Ground Station, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.
    • (J69) North Observatory, Clanfield, UK.
    • (K38) M57 Observatory, Saltrio, Italy.
    • (K61) Rokycany Observatory,Czech Republic.
    • (K65) Cesena Italy.
    • (K74) Muensterschwarzach Observatory, Schwarzach, Germany.
    • (K88) GINOP-KHK, Piszkesteto,Hungary.
    • (L04) ROASTERR-1 Observatory, Cluj-Napoca,Romania.
    • (Q62) iTelescope Observatory, Siding Spring, NSW,Australia.   
    • (T05) ATLAS-HKO, Haleakala,Hawaii,US.
    • (T12) Mauna Kea-UH/Tholen NEO Follow-U, Hawaii,US.
    • (W88) Slooh.com Chile Observatory, La Dehesa,Chile.
    • (Y28) OASI, Brazil.
    • (Z80) Northolt Branch Observatory, UK.
    • .
  • Perihelion Distance: .6653138187201434 (AU)
  • Aphelion Distance: 2.01493605513458 (AU)
  • Earth MOID: 0.000339608 AU (0.132 (LD)) or 31,568.536 miles (50,804.634 (KM))
  • Close-Approach to Earth: Will safely pass Earth on 2016-December-16 at a Nominal Distance of  0.0538386015810167 (AU) (20.952 (LD)) or 5,004,610.672 miles (8,054,140.158 (KM))

A image of the NEO 2016 WJ1 on 2016-12-01
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of  3 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the NEO 2016 WJ1 on 2016-12-01
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of  3 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the NEO 2016 WJ1 on 2016-12-01
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of  3 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
A image of the NEO 2016 WJ1 on 2016-12-01
from Siding Spring Observatory, Coonabarabran, NSW, Australia. (MPC Q62)
a stack of  3 - 60 second luminance BIN2 images taken with iTelescope.net's
(TEL T27 0.70-m f/6.6 reflector + CCD)
(C) Steven M. Tilley
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3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  2. by an an error a comment was removed
    David Dean:

    "Looks like observations were added from 2003 by Mauna Kea - precovery perhaps? This reduced orbital uncertainly down to 2. Looks like close passes for the next 100 years will be in fact passes. Good news!"

    Replies
    Steven M. Tilley
    "Yes it is good news"

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